Registor
Registor
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This simple calculator will help you determine the value of any SMD resistor. To get started, input the 3 or 4 digit code and hit the "Calculate" button or Enter.

Note: The program was tested rigorously, but it still may have a few bugs. So, when in doubt (and when it's possible) don't hesitate to use a multimeter to double-check the critical components.



How to calculate the value of an SMD resistor

Most chip resistors are marked with a 3-digit or 4-digit code -- the numerical equivalent of the familiar color code for through-hole components. Recently, a new coding system (the EIA-96) has appeared on precision SMDs.

The 3-digit code

Standard-tolerance SMD resistors are marked with a simple 3-digit code. The first two numbers will indicate the significant digits, and the third will be the multiplier, telling you the power of ten to which the two significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 10 ohms do not have a multiplier, the letter 'R' is used instead to indicate the position of the decimal point.

3-digit code examples:

220 = 22 x 100 (1) = 22Ω (not 220Ω!)
471 = 47 x 101 (10) = 470Ω
102 = 10 x 102 (100) = 1000Ω or 1kΩ
3R3 = 3.3Ω


The 4-digit code

The 4-digit code is used for marking precision surface mount resistors. It's similar to the previous system, the only difference is the number of significant digits: the first three numbers will tell us the significant digits, and the fourth will be the multiplier, indicating the power of ten to which the three significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 100 ohms are marked with the help of the letter 'R', indicating the position of the decimal point.

4-digit code examples:

4700 = 470 x 100 (1) = 470Ω (not 4700Ω!)
2001 = 200 x 101 (10) = 2000Ω or 2kΩ
1002 = 100 x 102